In the News

cuffs

21

May

Unlicensed Contractor Pays The Consequences

“If you operate without a business license, you will end up on the wrong side of the law.”

An unlicensed contractor in Nevada was sentenced to five years’ probation after he contracted without a license and diverted funds for his own personal use.

Read more
licensing

19

May

Columbia Councilman Wants Nonprofits to Pay a Business License Fee

“I’m really trying to find ways to generate revenue and make the system a little bit more fair when it comes to business license fees.”

Columbia City Council member doesn’t want to exempt nonprofits from paying business license fees. The main reason why is because his city is in desperate need of generating more revenue.

Read more
nevada

14

May

Nevada’s Proposed Business License Fee Will Fund Education

[T]he Governor’s plan supports early education and he believes it will make a difference.

The “it” in question is a proposed bill to increase business license fees. There’s a reason why they call a business license fee an ‘indirect tax.’ It has a lot to do with raising revenue.

Read more
newjersey

12

May

Opening a Fulfillment Center in New Jersey

Amazon.com is looking to facilitate its same-day deliveries in the New York City area by opening another 1 million-square-foot fulfillment center in New Jersey.

It’s actually their second fulfillment center in New Jersey, the other one being in Robbinsville. Incidentally, New Jersey is one of 24 states in which Amazon must collect sales tax. Merchants in these states have to pay a sales tax in addition to the fee Amazon charges to use its website and storage facilities. Are these merchants at a disadvantage because they have to pay both the sales tax and Amazon fee? Would they be better off selling their products in a state that doesn’t require a sales tax?

Read more
saas

22

April

Demo of Business License Technology

As a provider of business license solutions, we have gotten many recent requests to delve into technology for researching and managing heavy volumes of business licenses. In response to this demand, we have decided to do a quick demonstration (we’ll keep it under 20 minutes!) of how Fortune 500 tax, accounting, and legal departments use software to manage their licenses, permits, and tax registrations. Registration is free to the public.

We’re going to do it twice on Wednesday, May 6th.

For the 11am EST demonstration, you can sign up here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2298562409181316354

For the 2pm EST demonstration, you can sign up here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/7053908417889378306

Read more
mall

02

April

When Mall Operators Merge

“Regardless of the outcome, the drama is illuminating the often uneasy balance of power between big landlords and the retailers that fill their malls.”

Looking at this from Simon Property Group’s perspective, they should be very worried about their upcoming business license challenges. We would recommend that they monitor their renters very closely, because they will assume (at least) partial responsibility every time one of the retailers that fills their malls gets caught without proper licenses.

Read more
home-doctor

04

March

Business Licenses Q&A: Home Health Care Licensure

Question: Do different levels of care require different levels of licensure?

Amanda Gannon’s Response: Generally speaking, there aren’t separate licenses required for different types of health care providers (i.e. cardiologist versus general practitioner versus oncologist) to care for patients via home health care. There are, however, various levels of licensing for different types of care that may be delivered. You may only need a Home Care License to feed, bathe, dress and help patients with household chores. In turn, you would need a Home Health Care Agency License if you will be changing IVs, drawing blood, administering medications, or checking and recording vital signs. The complexity of obtaining the proper license is often directly correlated to the level of care you provide.

Read more
ticket

04

March

Business Licenses Q&A: How Do I Get Caught

Question: How do licensing authorities find out when companies are out of compliance?

David Singer’s Response: In the dark ages (of the past decade) authorities were able to find businesses that were out of compliance because all businesses were operated out of physical locations, typically in commercial spaces. The authorities were able to track and regulate businesses based on their advertisements outside their storefronts and in newspapers. In the modern era where more businesses are operating online, authorities are using a similar tactic with a twist. Since the government authorities can no longer properly trace products and services back to physical locations, they are using the advertising and marketing campaigns that businesses have created in order to find and regulate businesses operating within their jurisdictions. For example, if you will offer construction services in CA and advertise as such, you can expect a call or letter from the CA Contractor’s Board regarding the lack of a contractor’s license, followed by a fine. The bottom line is the same as it was in the past. If your customers can find you, then so can the government.

Read more
home-health

02

March

Home Health Care Cheat Sheet Now Available

Business Licenses, LLC has put the finishing touches on a new cheat sheet, this time breaking down every state according to their requirements for home health care licenses. The document is available for free.

Read more
disruptive

12

February

Webinar Will Examine Licensing Issues for Ridesharing Companies and Other Disruptive Businesses

There is no industry in America that is safe from disruption. Professionals who care about proper compliance with government rules and regulations should be aware of how their department may be turned on its head by sudden innovations that originate elsewhere. In an upcoming webinar, Business Licenses LLC will discuss disruptions and how they impact regulatory compliance for all of us. We will discuss some of the world’s most talked about business models and draw lessons that every tax and legal department will want to internalize.

In particular, our panel will discuss (1) Uber, Lyft, and the never-ending regulatory challenges of ridesharing companies, (2) the rise of home health care as an essential medical service, and (3) how technology upgrades have turned ordinary retailers into second-hand dealers.

The webinar will be conducted on Thursday, February 26th at 2pm EST. The presentation will run for 45 minutes, followed by questions. If you are interested, register here.

Read more